Cider Cocktail Recipe: Cider Cosmo

Are you looking for the perfect Thanksgiving (or any other winter holiday) cocktail? We’ve got you covered with the Cider Cosmo!

Isn’t that the drink from the 90s?, you may be asking.

Yes, indeed it is. The Cosmo may have gotten pigeonholed as the preferred drink of frou-frou Carrie Bradshaw types, but we think it’s worth a revisit and a reimagining. After all, it’s pretty undeniable that vodka, cranberry, orange and lime juice just taste really good together. So in our cider-ified twist, we’ve combined local vodka, orange allspice simple syrup, lime juice and Meriwether Cider‘s Cranberry Crosscut Cider for a refreshing seasonal cocktail.

Cranberry Crosscut is a seasonal release from Meriwether that’s included in the NW Cider Club‘s Winter Discover Box. Each quarter, the NW Cider Club releases boxes around a certain theme, and this one is is Big Sky Country, features rare ciders from Montana and Idaho. Cranberry Crosscut is quite tart and zippy, and gives the Cider Cosmo a considerable lift, versus just using canned or bottled cranberry juice!

Give our video a watch for a tutorial on how to make a Cider Cosmo; we’ve also included the recipe if you want to mix up a batch at your next gathering. To get in on the NW Cider Club action, sign up for the Winter Box by November 17, 2021!

Cider Cosmo

Makes 1 cocktail

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. local vodka
  • 0.5 oz. orange allspice simple syrup*
  • 0.25-0.5 oz. lime juice
  • 1.5 oz. Meriwether Cider Cranberry Crosscut

Method:

  1. Add vodka, simple syrup and lime juice to a cocktail shaker filled half way with ice. Shake for 20-30 seconds.
  2. Strain into a coupe or martini glass and top with Cranberry Crosscut cider. Garnish with a lime wheel, wedge or peel.

*To make orange allspice simple syrup, combine 1 cup water and 1 cup sugar in a saucepan over high heat. Once the sugar begins to dissolve, turn off the heat and stir to dissolve it completely. Add a few slices of orange and 1 teaspoon of allspice berries. Allow it to steep for a few hours, or up to overnight, then strain into a jar or container.

  • Feature photo: BigStock